Tomorrow At Monticello

  • 44° Chance Rain/Sleet
  • Mon 46° / 20°
  • Tue 38° / 26°
  • Wed 49° / 28°
  • Thu 38° / 18°

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Today’s Hours

Gates are open from 10 am to 5 pm.

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View of the partially reinstalled N. Passage, note the bedroll in the far right.
People today often forget how flexible rooms were in the past. The North Passage on the 2nd floor of Monticello is a prime example of multi-functionality. Of course it was a corridor, but it also acted as a storage area, work room, and as sleeping quarters for visitors and enslaved workers. This passage, approximately 8' wide by 27’ long, offered a considerable amount of useable space in the crowded household. The window on the north wall offered light and ventilation, modulating temperature...


Until recently, the Nursery has been used as a Curatorial storage room
Of all of the 2nd and 3rd floor spaces currently undergoing study, restoration, and re-interpretation at Monticello, the Nursery is the most complex as it requires extensive architectural restoration.  After Jefferson’s death, Jefferson Monroe Levy, who owned Monticello from 1878-1923, divided the Nursery into three sections--a vestibule, storage room, and bathroom. The bathroom and vestibule were removed by the Thomas Jefferson Foundation in the 1950s but the space was left unrestored....


The National Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol
This year, the Restoration Department concluded their research into the design of Monticello’s original exterior “Venetian” blinds. The search ultimately led them from Monticello to the U.S. Capitol. Monticello’s current blinds date to the early 20th century and have reached the end of their serviceable life. Nowadays exterior blinds, or “shutters” as most people refer to them, are merely decorative. However, in the 18th and early 19th centuries, they were an essential feature of virtually...


The National Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol
This year, the Restoration Department concluded their research into the design of Monticello’s original exterior “Venetian” blinds. The search ultimately led them from Monticello to the U.S. Capitol. Monticello’s current blinds date to the early 20th century and have reached the end of their serviceable life. Nowadays exterior blinds, or “shutters” as most people refer to them, are merely decorative. However, in the 18th and early 19th centuries, they were an essential feature of virtually...


On December 28, 1806, Thomas Jefferson wrote from Washington to his joiner James Dinsmore regarding progress of the ongoing construction projects at Monticello and Poplar Forest. Jefferson concluded the letter by adding yet another task to the growing list of jobs, a task prompted by his exasperation with the drunken behavior and erratic performance of his blacksmith, William Stewart. Jefferson told Dinsmore, "Stewart’s conduct is so intolerable that I must soon dismiss him. I wish you...


Jefferson spent much of his life “putting up and pulling down,” most notably during the forty-year construction period of Monticello. Influenced by his readings of ancient and modern architectural writings, Jefferson gleaned the best from both his reading and from his observations in Europe, creating in his architectural designs a style that was distinctively American. In this month’s Revolving Bookstand, Monticello’s Architectural Historian, Gardiner Hallock, recommends three “must reads” for...


Named for the mulberry trees planted along it, Mulberry Row was the center of plantation activity at Monticello from the 1770s to Jefferson's death in 1826. Jefferson's original plan for the site was a 400-foot-long row of shops and yards joined structurally so as to look like a single building. There, iron and woodworking facilities and areas for raising poultry and slaughtering livestock would serve as a link between the plantation at large and the domestic operations, like kitchen, dairy,...


Artist/Maker: Designed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, executed by Francisco Iardella (1793-1831) [1] Created: 1816 Origin/Purchase: Washington, D.C.? Materials: sandstone Dimensions: 45.7 x 53.3 x 53.3 (18 x 21 x 21 in.) Provenance: Benjamin Henry Latrobe; by gift to Thomas Jefferson; by purchase to James T. Barclay; by purchase to Uriah P. Levy; by descent to Jefferson M. Levy; by purchase to Thomas Jefferson Foundation in 1923. Accession Number: 1923-4 Historical Notes: Jefferson's involvement...


The Papers of Thomas Jefferson at Princeton University Princeton University Press Digital Jefferson Archives National Archives - Founders Online Library of Congress - Jefferson Papers The Massachusetts Historical Society - Thomas Jefferson Papers University of Virginia - Thomas Jefferson Digital Archive Calendar of The Jefferson Papers of the University of Virginia Other Documentary Projects and Editions The Adams Papers The Papers of James Madison The Dolley Madison Project The Papers of...


Children operating a working model based on Jefferson's Polygraph copying machin
A hands-on activity center for children Monticello visitors—especially those ages 6 to 12—can literally get in touch with American history in the Griffin Discovery Room through hands-on activities. This educational environment provides a variety of ways for young people to connect with Thomas Jefferson, the members of the larger Monticello community, and learn what life was like for children in the early 1800s. The space features reproduction elements from both the Monticello house, such as...