o. “servant's house”

Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery

Learn more about archaeological research at Monticello and the latest findings at site from the Chesapeake to the Carribean.

Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello: Paradox of Liberty

Enslaved Families of Monticello

Discover the history of six enslaved families who lived and worked at Monticello.  Visit our exhibition in partnership with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. More »

Dwelling for enslaved people—individuals and families
ca. 1770s–ca. 1801

<strong>o. "servant's house,"</strong> aerial view of excavation of a slave dwelling.Built during the early 1770s to serve as a dwelling for multiple enslaved families or individuals on Mulberry Row.  At some point in the late 1780s or early 1790s, this structure was replaced with another log building that Jefferson defined as “a servant’s house 20 ½ f. by 12 f. of wood, with a wooden chimney & earth floor.”  Although the identities of those who lived here is not known, archaeological evidence suggests that the dwelling was inhabited by a single family or kinship group until its demolition around 1801.

Tags

None
Login or register to tag items

Add comment

Login or register to post comments