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Read what Monticello staff members and guest authors have to say about Jefferson, Monticello, and how they experience Jefferson's experiment every day.

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This year Monticello launched the new ‘Getting Word’ website —a vast collection of oral histories, images, and documentation encompassing seven generations of families descended from Monticello’s African American community. The website is the result of decades of research, nearly twenty years of...More >>
Teri Allard, host of Charlottesville Inside Out shows how to get in touch with American history at Monticello's Griffin Discovery Room. Click here to watch the video »More >>
The New York Times calls it "an invaluable companion book" to the recently opened exhibition Slavery at Jefferson's Monticello: Paradox of Liberty. This pioneering work by Monticello's Shannon Senior Research Historian Cinder Stanton has deepened our understanding of Jefferson—his character and...More >>
Monticello's joint exhibition with the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture opens Jan 27., at the National Museum of American History on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Admission is free, and we hope you'll get a chance to experience it before it closes on Oct...More >>
Can’t You Make Them Behave, King George? By Jean Fritz Pictures by Tomie dePaola 1977 Reading level: 4 th -6 th grade While over thirty years old, this book’s text and pictures still make it a fun read. It traces King George’s life from boyhood to the end of the Revolutionary War. Our book club...More >>
The AP's Zinie Chen Sampson writes about three new projects launching this winter to shed light on the slaves who lived and worked at Monticello. The article has appeared in several U.S. media outlets as well as in the UK and India. Read it online (no longer available).More >>
Fountain Hughes, grandson of Monticello gardener Wormley Hughes
A recent entry in the New York Times' ongoing Disunion feature revisiting the Civil War, highlights an interview with Fountain Hughes, whose ancestors were slaves at Monticello, and cites the work of our own Cinder Stanton. Hughes's interview, originally recorded as part of the Slave Narrative...More >>
This past Saturday, December 3rd, the Museum Shop at Monticello hosted its first-ever “Handmade for the Holidays” event, and it was by all accounts a tremendous success! This fun-filled extravaganza featured local artisans, food, and drink, and offered the public not only the chance to shop for...More >>
Time for the December installment of our monthly series in which we post a recipe from The Virginia House-wife , a recipe book published in 1824 by Mary Randolph, kinswoman to Thomas Jefferson. Leni Sorensen, our African American Research Historian and a culinary historian of national repute, has...More >>
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Food and drink
It seems that the glory days of spurious Jefferson quotations have gone. Rarely do we get these types of questions any more. Now that we are experiencing a breather on that front, I've had the chance to ponder the phenomenon a bit. One thing I've been thinking about is what gives spurious quotes...More >>



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