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Read what Monticello staff members and guest authors have to say about Jefferson, Monticello, and how they experience Jefferson's experiment every day.


As you can see I used very ripe peaches donated to me at the Meade Park Farmer’s
Time for the August installment of our monthly series in which we post a recipe from The Virginia House-wife , a recipe book published in 1824 by Mary Randolph, kinswoman to Thomas Jefferson. Leni Sorensen, our African American Research Historian and a culinary historian of national repute, has...More >>
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Food and drink
Working at The Thomas Jefferson Center for Historic Plants would probably be a dream job for almost any horticulturalist; it certainly is for me. I love being a part of an organization that preserves the very spirit of one of America’s most dynamic and interesting founders. It is a feeling shared...More >>
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Gardens
Muhtar Kent congratulates a new citizen.  Click to view a gallery of images.
“Indeed, we are blessed -- all of us -- to have had founders here in America who had the foresight to create a Constitution that gives us all the right to search for a better life. A life of dignity. A life of freedom.” - Muhtar Kent, Chairman and C.E.O. of the Coca-Cola Corporation I have had the...More >>
In the third and final posting this series, we’ll briefly consider how the intellectual legacies of the New Archaeology affect current archaeological practice and our approach to the reanalysis of Pi-Sunyer ( part 1 ) and Kelso’s ( part 2 ) finds on Mulberry Row. Today, 30 years after Kelso’s work...More >>
“my god! how little do my countrymen know what precious blessings they are in possession of, and which no other people on earth enjoy.” Thomas Jefferson in a letter to James Monroe, June 17, 1785 When I do house tours at Monticello, I sometimes use this quotation in the entrance hall . Jefferson...More >>
As we saw last time , Oriel Pi-Sunyer conducted the first serious archaeogical fieldwork on Mulberry Row in 1957. He relied on an excavation method called cross trenching, whose main goal was finding and exposing masonry foundations. Over 20 years later, William Kelso brought a different set of...More >>
Chances are that you weren't able to be with us for this year's Independence Day Celebration and Naturalization Ceremony at Monticello. Not to worry. NBC's Today Show and The Coca-Cola Company have made their coverage of this inspiring event available online. In this brief but very moving video,...More >>
Muhtar Kent welcomes America's newest citizens at Monticello on July 4, 2011. Learn more about the annual Independence Day and Naturalization Ceremony at Monticello .More >>
Time for the July installment of our monthly series in which we post a recipe from The Virginia House-wife , a recipe book published in 1824 by Mary Randolph, kinswoman to Thomas Jefferson. Leni Sorensen, our African American Research Historian and a culinary historian of national repute, has once...More >>
Posted in: 
Food and drink
Everyone knows that archaeologists dig. But it is less widely appreciated that just how they dig and what they find varies with the kinds of questions they ask and the assumptions they make. Two excavation campaigns were conducted on Mulberry Row -- the first in 1957 and the second in the early...More >>

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