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Read what Monticello staff members and guest authors have to say about Jefferson, Monticello, and how they experience Jefferson's experiment every day.


As I type this, I can still hear the sounds of home educator families enjoying activities in the classrooms at Monticello’s Carl and Hunter Smith Education Center. Today, we were delighted to host our 2 nd Annual Home Educators’ Day. Despite heavy rain this morning, I’ve encountered lots of smiling...More >>
"So you work in the Archaeology Lab...but what do you do, exactly?" This is a question I have received a lot over the years from friends and visitors alike. The answer is, quite a variety of things, actually. Archaeology entails a lot more than the digging part. That’s what I love about it; it’s a...More >>
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Archaeology
Asparagus washed
Time for the March installment of our monthly series in which we post a recipe from The Virginia House-wife , a recipe book published in 1824 by Mary Randolph, kinswoman to Thomas Jefferson. Leni Sorensen, our African American Research Historian and a culinary historian of national repute, has once...More >>
Posted in: 
Food and drink
Mulberry Row
Building upon more than 50 years of archaeological investigation and documentary research, Monticello staff is now in the process of interpreting and restoring Mulberry Row . Lined with more than 20 dwellings, workshops, and sheds, Mulberry Row was the constantly-changing hub of the 5,000-acre...More >>
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Mulberry Row
I recently visited Virginia Tech for the Virginia Association of Museums Fundamentals Forum (sorry, Hoos). I had heard about this tradition or right-of-passage before, but while at Tech I heard someone (a student who had actually done it) mention the tradition of exploring the steam tunnels under...More >>
A tiny scrap of paper with Greek notes in Jefferson's hand tucked in Plutarch
By Ann Lucas Birle and Endrina Tay Last week, we had the privilege of being the first Monticello staff to set eyes on the more than 70 Jefferson books that we recently discovered at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL). We flew to St. Louis early on Valentine’s Day on February 14 to see...More >>
Ready to trim
Time for the February installment of our monthly series in which we post a recipe from The Virginia House-wife , a recipe book published in 1824 by Mary Randolph, kinswoman to Thomas Jefferson. Leni Sorensen, our African American Research Historian and a culinary historian of national repute, has...More >>
Posted in: 
Food and drink
James Ferguson, 1710-1776, was a sort of “Bill Nye the Science Guy” of the middle to late 1700s. A fellow of the Royal Society, he had done important work in observing and understanding the moon’s orbit, but his true calling turned out to be explaining science to the general public. Some of his...More >>
Want to know what Jefferson thought about a particular issue that continues to be relevant? Well, you're in luck. Or you will be in a year or so, when a digital archive of the papers of the Founding Fathers becomes publicly accessible. At Monticello, we've long been excited about the possibility...More >>
A revolution is brewing in the artisanal beer world, inspired by the taste of Thomas Jefferson and what was brewed historically at Monticello. The Thomas Jefferson Foundation, in collaboration with Starr Hill Brewery, announces the launch of Monticello Reserve Ale, the official beer of Monticello...More >>
Posted in: 
Food and drink

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