Tagged with 'Civil War'

Monticello and the Civil War

The Civil War[1]   had been underway for less than a year before casting its long dark shadow on Thomas Jefferson's "little mountain." In 1862, the authorities of the secessionist government in Virginia seized the house as alien property. This lasted until the post-war era when such seizures were returned to their rightful owners. The house was given back to the heirs of Captain Uriah Phillips Levy, who had died in New York City on March 22, 1862.

The Levy Family and Monticello

The following is condensed from an address, "The Levy Family and Monticello," written by the late Dr. Malcolm H. Stern, Genealogist at the American Jewish Archives, and delivered by Mr. Saul Viener at Monticello on June 7, 1985.

Benjamin Ficklin

History has generally overlooked Benjamin Franklin Ficklin (1827-1871). This is somewhat surprising, considering that Ficklin was instrumental in founding the Pony Express, participated in one of the Civil War's most desperate assaults, ran the blockade for the Confederacy, was arrested in connection with the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and barely escaped death numerous times while running freight and mail across the rough-hewn American West. He also once owned Monticello.