Tagged with 'education'

Monticello South Square Room

View Room Panorama Dimensions: 14' 10" x 15' 4"; ceiling 10' 0" Order: Tuscan Source: Palladio

Things To Do in the Charlottesville Area

Frequently listed among the best places to live in the U.S., Charlottesville is also a great place to visit. Whether you love food, history, the arts, or the great outdoors, Charlottesville has it all.  Local Historic Sites Charlottesville is rich with history. In addition to Jefferson, the area was home to Presidents James Madison and James Monroe. The University of Virginia, which Jefferson founded and designed, is (along with Monticello) a World Heritage site and an architectural masterpiece.

Quotations on the University of Virginia

1800. "we wish to establish in the upper & healthier country, & more centrally for the state an University on a plan so broad & liberal & modern, as to be worth patronising with the public support, and be a temptation to the youth of other states to come, and drink of the cup of knolege & fraternize with us."[1] Footnotes1. Jefferson to Joseph Priestley, January 18, 1800, in PTJ, 31:320.

Spurious Quotations

A collection of quotations commonly misattributed to Thomas Jefferson.

Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies

The Robert H. Smith ICJS is a multidisciplinary research center that oversees the work of several departments at Monticello and supports the ongoing international study of Thomas Jefferson and his world. Programs and Fellowships ICJS-sponsored conferences, fellowships, publications, and research. More »

Fellowships

The ICJS fellowship program for domestic and international scholars promotes research of Jefferson’s life and times and the community at Monticello.  Since its founding, the ICJS has hosted nearly 300 domestic and international scholars from the U.S.

Celebrating Black History Month with the Archaeology Family Workshop

One of the favourite parts of my job as an archaeological analyst at Monticello is presenting our research to visitors.  I love the opportunity to tell the story of those who made Monticello their home hundreds of years ago.  Things as simple as broken dishes, lost buttons, and discarded tobacco pipes can give incredible insights into the daily lives on this plantation.