Tagged with 'foodways'

Ice House

To keep ice for the plantation, Thomas Jefferson constructed an ice house.[1]  In the winter of 1802-1803 the summer's harvest of wheat was safely stored in barrels and barns. Monticello overseer Gabriel Lilly had to wait for freezing temperatures before he could harvest his next crop: ice from the Rivanna River.

Mammoth Cheese

In the summer of 1801, Elder John Leland persuaded the ladies of his Baptist congregation in Cheshire, Massachusetts, to manufacture a "mammoth cheese."[1] He intended to present it to President Jefferson in honor of his republicanism and his support of religious liberty.

Macaroni

Note: Thomas Jefferson used the word "macaroni" as a general term for pasta.

"Dinner is Served"

Guests to Monticello noted that the first dinner bell customarily rang at three o'clock, and the second called them to the table at four. When they arrived in the Dining Room, they quite likely found Thomas Jefferson reading. Having a self-described "canine appetite for reading" and hating to waste even a moment waiting for others to gather, he kept books on the fireplace mantel.