Tagged with 'founding foodie'

Monticello Dining Room

View Room Panorama Dimensions: 18' 6" x 18' 0"; ceiling 17' 9" (shown from perspective of Tea Room) Order: Doric Source: Palladio  

Mammoth Cheese

In the summer of 1801, Elder John Leland persuaded the ladies of his Baptist congregation in Cheshire, Massachusetts, to manufacture a "mammoth cheese."[1] He intended to present it to President Jefferson in honor of his republicanism and his support of religious liberty.

Tea Room

  View Room Panorama Dimensions: 15' 1"x 11' 2"; ceiling 17' 11" (shown on left; Dining Room is right) Order: Doric

The Vegetable Garden

The Site of The Vegetable Garden The 1,000-foot long garden terrace served as both a source of food and an experimental laboratory.  

"Attending to My Farm"

After inspecting the shops on Mulberry Row, Jefferson might have toured his gardens and farms.

Quotations On Agriculture

c. 1781. (Notes on the State of Virginia) "Those who labour in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen people, whose breasts he has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue. It is the focus in which he keeps alive that sacred fire, which otherwise might escape from the face of the earth." [1]

Jefferson-era Recipe: Tomata Catsup

Time for the September installment of our monthly series in which we post a recipe from The Virginia House-wife, a recipe book published in 1824 by Mary Randolph, kinswoman to Thomas Jefferson. Leni Sorensen, our African American Research Historian and a culinary historian of national repute, has once again made this month's dish and here we include her notes and pictures.

Jefferson-era Recipe: Pepper Vinegar

Time for the October installment of our monthly series in which we post a recipe from The Virginia House-wife, a recipe book published in 1824 by Mary Randolph, kinswoman to Thomas Jefferson. Leni Sorensen, our African American Research Historian and a culinary historian of national repute, has once again made this month's dish and here we include her notes and pictures.

Vegetarianism

Thomas Jefferson cannot be called a vegetarian as we understand the term today. In his own time, however, he was unusually moderate in his consumption of meat and was notable for the variety as well as the quantity of vegetables he ate. The documentary record includes several descriptions, including Jefferson's own, of his eating habits:

Ice Cream

While the claim that Thomas Jefferson introduced ice cream to the United States is demonstrably false, he can be credited with the first known recipe recorded by an American.  Jefferson also likely helped to popularize ice cream in this country when he served it at the President’s House in Washington.

"Dinner is Served"

Guests to Monticello noted that the first dinner bell customarily rang at three o'clock, and the second called them to the table at four. When they arrived in the Dining Room, they quite likely found Thomas Jefferson reading. Having a self-described "canine appetite for reading" and hating to waste even a moment waiting for others to gather, he kept books on the fireplace mantel.