Tagged with 'religion'

Monticello Podcasts

Jefferson and the Early Diplomatic Corps The recent controversy over release of U.S. diplomatic cables via Wikileaks got us thinking about how Jefferson, the U.S.'s first Secretary of State under the Constitution, and his successors communicated with their ambassadors and consuls abroad.

Thinking: it’s what Jefferson would want

So, I logged onto WordPress a few days ago, with vague thoughts of doing a semi-religion-related post, when I saw this.  A sign from God?  Well, at the very least, it’s a sign from Barbie dressed up as an Episcopalian minister, and that’s good enough for me.

That quotation does exist

I've been curiously watching the flutterings about this in the news for the past week or so - the Seattle Atheists are running a bus ad campaign featuring quotations by Jefferson and some other people. (You can see images of all three ads here.) Before anybody asks, that is in fact a genuine Jefferson quote - it's from a letter to Peter Carr, August 10, 1787.

Seattle Atheists are turning to the words of Thomas Jefferson

Though Thomas Jefferson was always reluctant to reveal his religious beliefs in public, today believers and nonbelievers alike often cite his words. Starting April 1, an excerpt from a letter Jefferson wrote on the subject to his nephew will appear on Seattle bus advertisements.

Wall of separation

I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between Church & State. --Thomas Jefferson to Danbury Baptists, January 1, 1802

Top 10: Misconceptions about Jefferson

Everybody loves countdowns, right?  Right.  So, I’ve come up with my own list of things people get wrong about Jefferson, based on my extensive observation of the stuff people put on the Internet or ask us about.  Here goes:

Hall

The Hall served as a reception area and waiting room for visitors and a museum of American natural history, western civilization, and American Indian cultures. View Room Panorama Overview Dimensions: 27' 11"x 23' 9"; ceiling 18' 2"