Tagged with 'restoration'

Fiske Kimball

Fiske Kimball (1888-1955) was an art historian and architect who served for thirty years as director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art (1925-1955) and for thirty-one years as Chairman of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation's Restoration Committee (1924-1955) and as a member of the Board (1939-1955).[1] During his long association with Monticello, Kimball defined the restoration goals for the house and grounds and oversaw the specifics of every restoration project as well as determining the collection polic

Tea Room

  View Room Panorama Dimensions: 15' 1"x 11' 2"; ceiling 17' 11" (shown on left; Dining Room is right) Order: Doric

The Levy Family and Monticello

The following is condensed from an address, "The Levy Family and Monticello," written by the late Dr. Malcolm H. Stern, Genealogist at the American Jewish Archives, and delivered by Mr. Saul Viener at Monticello on June 7, 1985.

Monticello Podcasts

Jefferson and the Early Diplomatic Corps The recent controversy over release of U.S. diplomatic cables via Wikileaks got us thinking about how Jefferson, the U.S.'s first Secretary of State under the Constitution, and his successors communicated with their ambassadors and consuls abroad.

Garden Pavilion

The Garden Pavilion is a structure designed and built by Thomas Jefferson near the end of his presidential term or in his early retirement years. One observer states, "...We walked into the gardens, to see the places where the best views presented themselves, & which Mr. Jefferson had fixed - on as favourite spots for walking, reading or reflection.

Jefferson’s “Venetian” blinds: a Story of Investigation and Restoration

This year, the Restoration Department concluded their research into the design of Monticello’s original exterior “Venetian” blinds. The search ultimately led them from Monticello to the U.S. Capitol.

West Portico Steps

The West Front of Monticello is one of the most widely recognized views of Thomas Jefferson's home. Thousands upon thousands of visitors have posed on the West Portico steps to have their images recorded in front of the facade that has graced coins, postage stamps, and countless other objects over the years. Every Fourth of July, new U.S. citizens are sworn in on the same masonry steps. But were there finished steps at the West Portico in Jefferson's day?