You are here

Tagged with “Farms, Food, and Gardens”

H. Ray Malone

Ray Malone was a software developer, after a career in broadcasting, and owner of radio stations.  His ancestors, of Irish origin, arrived in the Chillicothe, OH, area in the early nineteenth century and were farmers in Ross County.  From his uncle and grandfather, Malone heard stories about Madison Hemings that had come through his great-great-uncle Benjamin Malone, Hemings’s neighbor. 

 

Karen Hughes White

In 1996, four generations of the Hughes family of Fauquier County came to Monticello soon after learning of their descent from Rev. Robert Hughes of Union Run Baptist Church and head gardener Wormley Hughes of Monticello. Their ancestor was Reverend Hughes's son, also Wormley Hughes (1851-1901), who left Albemarle County with the Union army in the confusion at the end of the Civil War; his parents were "broken hearted."

Lloyd Hughes, Sr.

In 1996, four generations of the Hughes family of Fauquier County came to Monticello soon after learning of their descent from Rev. Robert Hughes of Union Run Baptist Church and head gardener Wormley Hughes of Monticello. The connection might have been broken because their ancestor, also Wormley Hughes (1851-1901), left Albemarle County with the Union army in the confusion at the end of the Civil War.

 

Ellen Hemings Roberts

Ellen Wayles Hemings, the youngest child of Madison and Mary Hemings, married her next-door neighbor Andrew Jackson Roberts in 1878.  In 1887 they left southern Ohio for Los Angeles, a city in the midst of a land boom.  Less than three percent of its population was African American.  A. J. Roberts first engaged in the hauling business and later established the first black-owned mortuary in Los Angeles.  Both Robertses were active members of the Baptist church.

Lucille Roberts Balthazar

Lucille Balthazar, only three generations removed from Madison Hemings of Monticello, heard of her connection to Jefferson from her father, William Giles Roberts, although he rarely spoke of it.  He participated in the family mortuary business and owned a farm northeast of Los Angeles in the Apple Valley, where he had gardens and orchards.  Mrs. Balthazar knew her grandmother, Ellen Hemings Roberts, well and loved to go to dinner at her house.  Her grandmother “always set the table beautifully....each of us had our silver napkin rings with our name on it.”

Pages

Participate

Login or register to participate in our online community.