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Tagged with “Religion”

Martha Fletcher

In 1998, the pastor and several members of Cumminsville Baptist Church in Cincinnati generously shared what they had heard about the founder of their church. The Rev. Peter Fossett’s presence is still vivid a century after his death. His photograph is in the vestibule of the church building, in which the congregation moved because of construction of an interstate highway. The Rev.

George Southerland

In 1998, the pastor and several members of Cumminsville Baptist Church in Cincinnati generously shared what they had heard about the founder of their church. The Rev. Peter Fossett’s presence is still vivid a century after his death.  His photograph is in the vestibule of the church building, to which the congregation moved because of construction of an interstate highway. The Rev.

Zeta Brown Nichols

Zeta Brown Nichols grew up in Keswick, just east of Charlottesville. She shared memories of life in the area in the 1940s and 50s. Like many others in the Hern family, she became a teacher, initially in a one-room schoolhouse in western Albemarle County and later at Albemarle Training School. She learned of her connection to Monticello from her aunt Martha Hearns Boston, also a teacher.  

William Webb

After retiring from a career in banking, Bill Webb began to investigate his family history. His interest had been sparked by a family Bible record of his ancestor Brown Colbert that he saw as a child in Parkersburg, West Virginia. The research of Bill and his wife, Eva Kobus-Webb, revealed the connection to Monticello and brought to light other Colbert descendants like the Civil War soldier George Edmondson and suffragist Coralie Franklin Cook.

Timothy Hughes

In 1996, four generations of the Hughes family of Fauquier County came to Monticello soon after learning of their descent from Rev. Robert Hughes of Union Run Baptist Church and head gardener Wormley Hughes of Monticello. The connection might have been broken because their ancestor, also Wormley Hughes (1851-1901), left Albemarle County with the Union army in the confusion at the end of the Civil War.

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