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Read what Monticello staff members and guest authors have to say about Jefferson, Monticello, and how they experience Jefferson's experiment every day.

A kitchen garden at the White House is not a new idea. In the early years of the nation, vegetables...More >>
Once-and-future ICJS fellow Andrea Wulf published a short, fascinating article in The Guardian just...More >>
Posted in: 
A Summary View, Gardens
So, I just joined Goodreads , a large online community for readers, and lo and behold, there is a...More >>
The Mental Floss blog is having a Tournament of Genius instead. Thomas Jefferson was pitted against...More >>
Well, it's the 144th birthday of Paul Leicester Ford. I know you're asking, who the heck's that guy...More >>
The Bradford pear trees are blooming this week (at least I think they're Bradford pear trees, but I have been known to misidentify plants), and for once on the first official day of the season it actually seems like said season. Just in time for all this, there's a new book from the University of Virginia Press: Historic Virginia Gardens: Preservation WoMore >>
Posted in: 
A Summary View, Gardens
I've already mentioned this book in a previous blog post, but this blogger's discussion of David G...More >>
And by "extravaganza" I mean "two book reviews in one issue." In the latest Virginia Magazine of...More >>
Just arrived inexplicably on our desk the other day ( Museum Shop ? Is that you, sending us...More >>
American Scientist is getting a lot of mileage out of Jefferson lately. In the March-April 2009 issue of American Scientist , mathematician Lawren Smithline helps out the folks at the Papers of Thomas Jefferson by decoding a supposedly-unbreakably-encoded message sent to Jefferson by Philadelphia smarty-pants Robert Patterson in 1801.More >>



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